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I'm Katie with a K. Catherine with a C.
I'm a writer and personal trainer and I live in New York City.

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November 28th
10:28 AM EST
The new domesticity: Fun, empowering or a step back for American women?

But lately, many women (and a few men) are diving into domesticity with a  sense of moral purpose. The homemade jar of jam becomes a symbol of  resistance to industrial food and its environment-defiling ways. This  view has been brewing for a while, a thick stew of Slow Food and  locavorism and DIY brought to a boil by recession and anxiety. Suddenly,  learning the old-fashioned skills of our great-grandmothers seems not  just fun, but necessary and even virtuous.
“This was initially about being frugal and concerned with what I put in  my body,” says Kate Payne, 30, the Austin-based author of “The Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking” and something of a guru on the new-domesticity scene. “But it became  about the politics. . . . Am I going to buy cheap crap, or am I going to  do this stuff myself?”
[photo by Julia Rothman for The Washington Post]
(via The Hairpin)

The new domesticity: Fun, empowering or a step back for American women?

But lately, many women (and a few men) are diving into domesticity with a sense of moral purpose. The homemade jar of jam becomes a symbol of resistance to industrial food and its environment-defiling ways. This view has been brewing for a while, a thick stew of Slow Food and locavorism and DIY brought to a boil by recession and anxiety. Suddenly, learning the old-fashioned skills of our great-grandmothers seems not just fun, but necessary and even virtuous.

“This was initially about being frugal and concerned with what I put in my body,” says Kate Payne, 30, the Austin-based author of “The Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking” and something of a guru on the new-domesticity scene. “But it became about the politics. . . . Am I going to buy cheap crap, or am I going to do this stuff myself?”

[photo by Julia Rothman for The Washington Post]

(via The Hairpin)

November 27th
3:00 PM EST

Reading material for your reading pleasure

"The Science of Sarcasm? Yeah, Right" - Smithsonian Magazine (via)

"How gossip took over the news" - Slate

"Should We All Go Gluten-Free?" - NY Times

"The science of taste"- Slate

September 23rd
11:33 AM EST

Another Typewriter Takeover

tetw:

Today’s guest editor - Katiecar

Another voracious reader has taken control of the typewriter, picking the reads this time is top bookstore blogger Katiecar.

If anyone else has any top-quality reading material they think we should be sharing with the world, please get in touch.

Shameless Self-promotion time! I did some guest editing for The Electric Typewriter. Read these if you get a chance:

Thanks to TETW for inviting me to submit! 

(Source: tetw)

August 4th
5:42 PM EST

Books Without Borders- My Life at the World's Dumbest Bookstore Chain

blogfrombookstores:

“The heartbreaking thing is that this fall, over 10,000 bookstore employees across America will be out of work. The way the publishing industry is going, many of those people won’t be able to find jobs that are even tangentially related to books anymore; they’ll go on to work in movie theaters and grocery stores and as secretaries and child-care providers. They probably won’t be able to spend their days being obsessed with books, and that’s a bad thing for books, which have a hard enough time battling for attention in popular media.”

This is a great read and it also goes really well with my own little rant about Borders.

[via Scribner Books]

July 27th
8:49 PM EST

Don't Write What You Know

"Why fiction’s narrative and emotional integrity will always transcend the literal truth"

(via rachelfershleiser)

July 26th
8:05 AM EST
"The British satirist Auberon Waugh once wrote a letter to the editor of the Daily Telegraph asking readers to supply information about his life between birth and the present, explaining that he was writing his memoirs and had no memories from those years. I find myself in the opposite position. I remember everything. All my life I’ve been visited by unexpected flashes of memory unrelated to anything taking place at the moment. These retrieved moments I consider and replace on the shelf. When I began writing this book, memories came flooding to the surface, not because of any conscious effort but simply in the stream of writing. I started in a direction and the memories were waiting there, sometimes of things I hadn’t consciously thought about since. Hypnosis is said to enable us to retrieve past memories. When I write, I fall into the zone many writers, painters, musicians, athletes, and craftsmen of all sorts seem to share: In doing something I enjoy and am expert at, deliberate thought falls aside and it is all just there. I think of the next word no more than the composer thinks of the next note."
July 25th
3:44 PM EST
"You are seeing the chains are failing. And there are people who will always want the printed book – it’s just something special. There are times where even when it’s convenient to read on your e-reader, you want that printed word, you want that piece of art. You want it on your shelf. You want it in your hands. It just means something so special."
July 23rd
1:47 PM EST

Sharp Fiction by Young Women: If You Have Only One Week in L.A.,

I forget when I am with people that they might have been other people before meeting me. I may have been different, too.

July 19th
8:01 AM EST

The Price of Typos

Some readers like to see portraits of authors they admire, study their personal histories or hear them read aloud. I like to know whether an author can spell. Nabokov spelled beautifully. Fitzgerald was crummy at spelling, bedeviled by entry-level traps like “definate.” Bad spellers, of course, can be sublime writers and good spellers punctilious duds. But it’s still intriguing that Fitzgerald, for all his gifts, didn’t perceive the word “finite” in definite, the way good spellers automatically do. Did this oversight color his impression of infinity? Infinaty?

Spell check is evil.

(Source: The New York Times)

July 14th
9:45 AM EST

How J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter Saved Reading

"Harry, nevertheless, arouses greater empathy because he seems to be a child liberated from the control of dull, distracted adults, rejecting his soulless environment. No sensitive child would want to grow up to be Harry’s Muggle relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Dursley of No. 4 Privet Drive. Harry Potter allows children of the suburbs to loathe their Little Boxes, to fly a nebulous broom, play non-televisable sports and aspire to a life out of the ordinary. Whether read in Seattle, Sarajevo or Soweto, Harry gives children a license to judge the adult world—and find it wanting."

July 12th
8:24 AM EST

How Harry Potter Became the Boy Who Lived Forever

It’s human nature to press at the boundaries of stories, to scrabble at the edges, to want to know what’s going on just out of range of the camera. Fan fiction teems with prequels and sequels, missing scenes restored and plot holes patched. It retells canonical stories from new points of view — the reverse-angle instant replay. How did the events of The Prisoner of Azkaban look from Neville Longbottom’s perspective? Moaning Myrtle’s? Mrs. Norris’? “To say that a story stops after we close a book is absurd,” says Maltese. “To say that we can think certain things about a story or what might happen next in a story or what might have happened if someone had turned left instead of right but that we can’t write them down is absurd.” (via)

July 10th
10:00 AM EST

Read these:

"Sheryl Sandberg & Male-Dominated Silicon Valley" The New Yorker ~ There is a lot to take in with this. I’m sort of rolling my eyes, sort of saying, ‘Hell yeah!’ and sort of like, OK who the hell is this woman?! Because she works for Facebook, the President, and Disney, which sounds like the perfect recipe for taking over the world in some sort of covertly evil way. Eeek.

"The Art of Community Management" Kidogo ~ Manage communities like it’s your job. (via David Noel)

"Let’s Just All Talk About the Things That Bug Us About Harry Potter" The Hairpin ~ The first one and the last two. Ron is not unattractive.

"In Which We’re Really Down on Optimus Prime" This Recording ~You don’t want to do something after Megan Fox has done it, you want to do it well before or not at all.”

"Caylee & Brisenia: Why The Difference In Coverage?" News Taco ~ The media is so fair and balanced. Not.

"I Flunked My Social Media Background Check" Gizmodo~ Food for thought.

"Counting Down the Pottermeter" Rotten Tomatoes~ I keep getting the chills whenever I read articles like this. Which has been multiple times everyday this week.

July 3rd
1:19 PM EST

Read these:

"Space stasis: What the strange persistence of rockets can teach us about innovations." Slate ~ Rockets are expensive.

"Fun With Maps: Seven Peculiar U.S. Borders" The Awl ~ Colorado is NOT a perfect rectangle!

"The British Equivalent of ‘That’s What She Said’" TIFO ~ For so many reasons, this is the best article I’ve read all month. So many reasons. (via oneafter909)

"Inside Google+ - How the Search Giant Plans to Go Social" Wired ~ Relevant.

June 28th
8:18 AM EST

When Steve Met Jo- J.K. Rowling

When it was time to say goodbye, I wrote my email address down for Steve on the back of a torn receipt in my wallet. He read the address, then flipped over the receipt and said, “Penny Black—what’s that?” I said: “It’s the make of the top I’m wearing.” He tucked the receipt away muttering, “I just like knowing stuff like that.” As odd names on scraps of paper are perennially fascinating to me too, that clinched my feeling that I’d met a kindred spirit.

The important thing to know is that I had complete confidence in him, from that one meeting in L.A. He’d said enough during those few hours together to convince me that he had a real connection to the characters. As we subsequently agreed during our decade-plus email conversation about the books, when you strip away all of the diversionary magic, the Potter novels boil down to the characters: our relationship with them and theirs with each other.

(Source: effectlesspills-)