Get In the Car, Loser
I'm Katie with a K. Catherine with a C.
I'm a writer and personal trainer and I live in New York City.

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March 16th
2:45 PM EST
This is entirely true.

This is entirely true.

(Source: thingsmakemehappy, via rachelfershleiser)

March 13th
11:30 AM EST
"Life will break you. Nobody can protect you from that, and living alone won’t either, for solitude will also break you with its yearning. You have to love. You have to feel. It is the reason you are here on earth. You are here to risk your heart. You are here to be swallowed up. And when it happens that you are broken, or betrayed, or left, or hurt, or death brushes near, let yourself sit by an apple tree and listen to the apples falling all around you in heaps, wasting their sweetness. Tell yourself you tasted as many as you could."
—  Louise Erdrich, The Painted Drum (via bookmania)

(Source: goodreads.com, via bookmania)

March 6th
10:00 AM EST

Oatmeal for breakfast is awesome, but if you can’t have cinnamon in it, then what’s the point?

Two mornings ago, I woke up, drank two cups of coffee, read a few chapters of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and decided to make a bowl of oatmeal when I felt my stomach starting to growl. I poured the oats into a bowl. I mashed up a banana and mixed it in. I poured in a cup of almond milk. I went to grab the cinnamon so I could sprinkling a bit of it into the mix and complete the oatmeal-making process. Where was the cinnamon?

I scanned the counter. I put cinnamon in my oatmeal every morning. I always placed it back in the same spot on the counter, where could it have gone? I opened both doors to the spice cabinet and searched around. I moved the other spices- cumin, paprika, nutmeg- around like chess pieces, all the while keeping my eyes peeled for the cinnamon. It wasn’t in there. With my left hand still on the cabinet door’s handle, I spun around and looked toward the kitchen table and then did a once over of the entire room. Nothing. No cinnamon anywhere. I turned back to the cabinet, moved each and every spice all around for a second time, and when I could officially confirm it was not on the lowest shelf, grabbed a chair from the kitchen table for assistance in searching the two upper spice shelves. It wasn’t up there either. 

For a minute I thought about popping the bowl of oatmeal into the microwave and eating it without any cinnamon, but that notion didn’t last long at all because I remembered that oatmeal without cinnamon tastes like plain, boring oatmeal. Unacceptable. So, I had to call my mom, because it’s a rule of life that even when they don’t know where things are, moms always know where things are.

"Hi Mom, do you know where the cinnamon went?" I asked.

"Uhh, no. I haven’t used any cinnamon recently." She said.

"But I always put it back in the same spot and it’s not there anymore so you must have moved it," I complained.

"Kate, I didn’t move the cinnamon. I know it for a fact. Just look around, it has to be there somewhere," she tells me.

She’s a neat freak, so deep down I knew that if she said she didn’t move it, she definitely didn’t move it. She would remember if she had put it away somewhere. But since I still can’t find the cinnamon and she doesn’t know where it is, I hang onto the notion that she must have moved it and just didn’t remember.

"Ugh, ok… whatever. Never mind. I’ll talk to you later," I sigh.

"Bye," she says.

At this point, like twenty minutes later, I was too hungry to care about the very specific tastes of my breakfast. My stomach was growing impatient and I was just going to have to settle for a less than satisfactory morning meal. I threw the bowl into the microwave and when it was ready, I leaned back against the counter, bowl and spoon in hand, and began to eat. Two-and-half bites into my delayed breakfast, for no reason at all (I swear I wasn’t still looking for it; I had fully accepted the absence of the cinnamon at that point) I nonchalantly turned my head to the right, and out of the corner of my eye saw none other than the stupid, little brown bottle that I had been searching for peaking out from behind the standing paper towel rack.

Thank god for my wandering eye, because I got to have cinnamon in my oatmeal that morning after all, which proves two of life’s undoubtable truths; the moment you stop looking for something, it will almost immediately reveal itself to you, and, your mom is always right. Always right.

March 4th
1:42 PM EST

brooklynmutt:

The Story of Keep Calm and Carry On

(by BarterBooksLtd)

January 27th
9:10 AM EST
January 4th
4:24 PM EST
millionsmillions:

“I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours.”
— Hunter S. Thompson

millionsmillions:

“I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours.”

Hunter S. Thompson

December 25th
12:15 AM EST
"And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time."
—  T.S. Eliot (via nedhepburn)
December 13th
4:12 PM EST

2011: A year of reading in review!

(Most links lead to something I wrote about the book or a favorite quote!)  

Bicycle Diaries by David Byrne

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer (again!)

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Just Kids by Patti Smith

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (again!)

Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Justice in Everyday Life: The Way it Really Works by Howard Zinn

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach

What did you read this year?

2:56 PM EST

Every damn day.

(via sevendeadlyequations-deactivate)

9:18 AM EST
"Each of us, deep down, believes that the whole world issues from his own precious body, like images projected from a tiny slide onto an earth-sized screen. And then, deeper down, each of us knows he’s wrong."
—  Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding
November 15th
11:05 AM EST
 Uh, uh. Not cool!
[via The Village Voice & scribnerbooks]

 Uh, uh. Not cool!

[via The Village Voice & scribnerbooks]

November 1st
2:21 PM EST

blogfrombookstores:

Blogging From: The Book Revue

[The Book Revue’s] discount tables are the main contributing component to the fact that I have more books than I actually know what to do with.

This may come as a shock to you, but I’m not a millionaire. I try to be somewhat frugal, (which is hard to do when it comes to books) but when I pay a visit to The Book Revue, it is extremely rare occurrence if I don’t leave with at least two new books in hand. But most times, it’s like five. Call it excessive, but when the books are this affordable it’s hard not to be glutinous. It’s so hard! (Continue Reading)

October 25th
4:42 PM EST
A new home for my books and a more productive workspace. Wait, that second part is a lie. The only way this desk would make me more productive is if it blocked my access to Tumblr. Which, it does not. My books look cozy, though.

A new home for my books and a more productive workspace. Wait, that second part is a lie. The only way this desk would make me more productive is if it blocked my access to Tumblr. Which, it does not. My books look cozy, though.

October 18th
8:43 AM EST
blogfrombookstores:

At Zuccotti Park, A People’s Library

Amid one of the most dynamic political events in recent American history lies one of the most harmonious of places – a library.
Occupy Wall Street has become known for its animated protests and run-ins with police, but walk inside Zuccotti Park – the movement’s unofficial headquarters – and you get a different story. Organizers have created a medical center, food station, and donation drop-off point. But it’s “The People’s Library” that has become an example of the group’s mission and outside support.  
“The library is a demonstration of the fact we aren’t just a bunch of crazies,” said Stephen Boyer, 27, who volunteers there. “Were trying to build a community and we’re succeeding.” (Read more)
(via)
[photo by Kevin Lorla]

blogfrombookstores:

At Zuccotti Park, A People’s Library

Amid one of the most dynamic political events in recent American history lies one of the most harmonious of places – a library.

Occupy Wall Street has become known for its animated protests and run-ins with police, but walk inside Zuccotti Park – the movement’s unofficial headquarters – and you get a different story. Organizers have created a medical center, food station, and donation drop-off point. But it’s “The People’s Library” that has become an example of the group’s mission and outside support.  

“The library is a demonstration of the fact we aren’t just a bunch of crazies,” said Stephen Boyer, 27, who volunteers there. “Were trying to build a community and we’re succeeding.” (Read more)

(via)

[photo by Kevin Lorla]

September 24th
10:47 AM EST
"And you know, this thought crossed my mind at the time: maybe chance is a pretty common thing after all. Those kinds of coincidences are happening all around us, all the time, but most of them don’t attract our attention and we just let them go by. It’s like fireworks in the daytime. You might hear a faint sound, but even if you look up at the sky you can’t see a thing. But if we’re really hoping something may come true it may become visible, like a message rising to the surface. Then we’re able to make it out clearly, decipher what it means. And seeing it before us we’re surprised and wonder at how strange things like this can happen. Even though there’s nothing strange about it."
—  Haruki Murakami (via bookmania)

(Source: bookmania)