Get In the Car, Loser
I'm Katie with a K. Catherine with a C.
I'm a writer and personal trainer and I live in New York City.

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November 16th
12:54 PM EST

Props to Tumblr for raising awareness and taking action.

Tumblr Staff just reported that useres are averaging 3.6 calls per second to their local representatives, urging them to oppose the ‘Stop Online Piracy Act.’

I just followed the steps Tumblr has given to make the call. It was not scary

If you haven’t yet, make the call and make a difference.

Spread the word.

September 17th
11:08 AM EST
blogfrombookstores:

 Banned Books Week: What subversives are you reading?

Why should Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston  (one of my personal favorites) be a banned book? Because it acknowledges  that sometimes men didn’t treat their wives so well, or because it  features a large cast of African-American people?  (I suspect strongly  that, while it’s both, it’s also very much the latter–there is a high  proportion of banned literature by African-American novelists.)  Are The Grapes of Wrath and The Jungle taboo  because they shine a light on the real struggles of the poor and  working-class Americans?  Mental illness, women’s issues, sex, money,  racism, equal rights–it’s not smut that is being consistently  challenged, or things that are actually depraved.  (Continue reading)
[via The Insatiable Booksluts]

blogfrombookstores:

Banned Books Week: What subversives are you reading?

Why should Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (one of my personal favorites) be a banned book? Because it acknowledges that sometimes men didn’t treat their wives so well, or because it features a large cast of African-American people?  (I suspect strongly that, while it’s both, it’s also very much the latter–there is a high proportion of banned literature by African-American novelists.)  Are The Grapes of Wrath and The Jungle taboo because they shine a light on the real struggles of the poor and working-class Americans?  Mental illness, women’s issues, sex, money, racism, equal rights–it’s not smut that is being consistently challenged, or things that are actually depraved.  (Continue reading)

[via The Insatiable Booksluts]