Get In the Car, Loser
I'm Katie with a K. Catherine with a C.
I'm a writer and personal trainer and I live in New York City.

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September 22nd
12:28 PM EST
September 14th
10:36 PM EST
blogfrombookstores:

Join Busboys and Poets on September 21 for International Peace Day and the dedication of their Howard Zinn room! And tomorrow on Blogging from Bookstores learn more about Independent coffee shop, restaurant, and bookstore (Yes! It’s all three in one!) Busboys and Poets!

blogfrombookstores:

Join Busboys and Poets on September 21 for International Peace Day and the dedication of their Howard Zinn room! And tomorrow on Blogging from Bookstores learn more about Independent coffee shop, restaurant, and bookstore (Yes! It’s all three in one!) Busboys and Poets!

September 12th
8:54 PM EST
"'I know bookstores are supposed to be good things, but we don’t have video stores anymore, and maybe we need to get used to the new order instead of lamenting the old.' This is what I’d say to his point: it totally sucks that there’s no more video stores. I spent long nights hanging out at Kim’s in college, deliberating for hours over which random German film from the nineteen-seventies to take home with me. I actually watched stuff like that all the way through then, maybe since I’d spent so much time and energy looking for it. I even miss Blockbuster: when I was a kid, the Friday-night trip to the video store to pick out a movie was the most exciting event of the week. How I watch a video now is: I browse on Netflix for a while, start watching something, get about five minutes in, wonder if I’ve made the right decision, and start the process over. It’s ridiculous, and yet I can’t…stop…clicking…

My point is that I wish we had been able to save the video store. I know the young citizens of the new order don’t miss it, but kids don’t miss anything: they’re kids. And since we haven’t entirely killed the bookstore yet, I would like us not to. Going into bookstores to browse, to attend readings, to interact with the staff, to see the selection they’ve curated—all these things excite me and entice me to read. If my book-buying experience becomes simply me sitting alone on the couch click, click, clicking, I don’t know what I’ll become…"
September 3rd
10:15 AM EST
"With the demise of the Borders chain and the shaky footing of Barnes and Noble, one might be tempted to write off the whole business. But as one who spent her summer on a book tour, I would like to offer this firsthand report from the front lines: Americans are still reading books. Night after night after night I showed up in a different bookstore and people were there with their hardbacks. Sure, I signed a couple of iPad covers, Kindle covers. I’ve got no problem with that. But just because some people like their e-readers doesn’t mean we should sweep all the remaining paperbacks in a pile and strike a match. Maybe bookstores are no longer 30,000 square feet, but they are selling books."
—  Ann Patchett- “OF Bugs and Books” NY TIimes (via blogfrombookstores)

(via blogfrombookstores)

August 31st
11:36 AM EST

The death of books has been greatly exaggerated

blogfrombookstores:

It’s almost impossible for someone who has spent decades working in a calm, creative environment not to be enraged by the sight of American technology companies tipping everything on its head.

But let’s not overdo things. Let’s not lose sight of the data we have, and let’s not invent data when we only have anecdotes. And finally, let’s not forget the wonders this new world opens up. Being able to download a book to read instantaneously wherever you are is a thing of wonder, after all (and there is some anecdotal suggestion that people are coming back to books via new digital platforms).

For authors, the chance to reach out to readers, instantly and effectively, is changing the way titles are marketed and delivers a glorious independence that comes with having your own digital presence to curate and to shape. There are new creative opportunities offered by interactive technologies. There is the chance to play in a world where books and stories can be either the private, cherished experience of old or a public, shared conversation with other readers from across the world.

So yes, the party’s still on. It’s not quite the same party, the drink’s a good deal cheaper and we’ve got crisps, not caviar. But there are more people invited, and some of them look pretty groovy. I’ll not get my coat just yet.

And as I learned from a fellow bookshop browser this weekend, people still love their bookstores!

August 26th
8:28 PM EST
blogfrombookstores:

[By Neil Stavely - Horse and Hare on Etsy]
Howard Zinn. Best Historian Ever. Truer words have never been so nicely illustrated next to such a great man’s portrait.
In related news, I just found out that Kerry and Neil Stavely are the lovely artists who supply The Winchester Book Gallery with the amazing author portraits displayed and sold in their store. 
If this Howard Zinn portrait isn’t enough to lure you into checking out the rest of their work then…wait, what am I saying? It’s Howard Zinn! They drew Howard Zinn! Go check out their work!
(If you like blogs, they also blog here.)

I just fell in love a little bit.

blogfrombookstores:

[By Neil Stavely - Horse and Hare on Etsy]

Howard Zinn. Best Historian Ever. Truer words have never been so nicely illustrated next to such a great man’s portrait.

In related news, I just found out that Kerry and Neil Stavely are the lovely artists who supply The Winchester Book Gallery with the amazing author portraits displayed and sold in their store. 

If this Howard Zinn portrait isn’t enough to lure you into checking out the rest of their work then…wait, what am I saying? It’s Howard Zinn! They drew Howard Zinn! Go check out their work!

(If you like blogs, they also blog here.)

I just fell in love a little bit.

August 18th
10:42 AM EST

blogfrombookstores:

Blogging From: Winchester Book Gallery

“Today I am at Winchester Book Gallery. Winchester Book Gallery is the kind of bookstore that has a totally swoon-worthy window display and just anoverall really attractive storefront that lets you know, without even having to read a sign, that it is a bookstore you definitely won’t want to pass by.” (Read more)

August 12th
12:54 PM EST
"And then, there are the rules of the store. First, you can only get in when it is open. Second, no cell phones. This is a book store and not a phone booth. Third, there are words and phrases that you can’t use in my store: like, oh my God, neat, sweet, have a good one, that’s a good question, totally, whatever, perfect, Kindle or Amazon. These words give me brain damage. I’m serious. When people use them in here, I tell them to get a thesaurus and stop being so mentally lame."
August 4th
5:42 PM EST

Books Without Borders- My Life at the World's Dumbest Bookstore Chain

blogfrombookstores:

“The heartbreaking thing is that this fall, over 10,000 bookstore employees across America will be out of work. The way the publishing industry is going, many of those people won’t be able to find jobs that are even tangentially related to books anymore; they’ll go on to work in movie theaters and grocery stores and as secretaries and child-care providers. They probably won’t be able to spend their days being obsessed with books, and that’s a bad thing for books, which have a hard enough time battling for attention in popular media.”

This is a great read and it also goes really well with my own little rant about Borders.

[via Scribner Books]

August 1st
6:21 PM EST

Amazon, eBooks, and the demise of Borders and bookshop culture

Because I like bookstores – large and small.  I like browsing.  I like wandering the aisles and touching the books.  Picking them up and feeling their weight.  I like to pick an edition based on the way the pages feel in my hand.  For me, buying a book is a tactile experience. 

I like to browse books by subject – to get lost in the non-fiction section discovering biographies on obscure yet fascinating subjects.  I like to be able to compare a book to its fellows.  Rarely do I go into a book store with a specific purchase in mind.  Through looking (and touching) I find the book that’s right for me at the moment – a book that fits my mood, my budget, my plans for the rest of the day.

Precisely.

(via blogfrombookstores)