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I'm Katie with a K. Catherine with a C.
I'm a writer and personal trainer and I live in New York City.

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March 4th
1:42 PM EST

brooklynmutt:

The Story of Keep Calm and Carry On

(by BarterBooksLtd)

January 27th
9:10 AM EST
December 13th
4:12 PM EST

2011: A year of reading in review!

(Most links lead to something I wrote about the book or a favorite quote!)  

Bicycle Diaries by David Byrne

Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer (again!)

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Just Kids by Patti Smith

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (again!)

Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Justice in Everyday Life: The Way it Really Works by Howard Zinn

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach

What did you read this year?

November 15th
11:05 AM EST
 Uh, uh. Not cool!
[via The Village Voice & scribnerbooks]

 Uh, uh. Not cool!

[via The Village Voice & scribnerbooks]

November 1st
2:21 PM EST

blogfrombookstores:

Blogging From: The Book Revue

[The Book Revue’s] discount tables are the main contributing component to the fact that I have more books than I actually know what to do with.

This may come as a shock to you, but I’m not a millionaire. I try to be somewhat frugal, (which is hard to do when it comes to books) but when I pay a visit to The Book Revue, it is extremely rare occurrence if I don’t leave with at least two new books in hand. But most times, it’s like five. Call it excessive, but when the books are this affordable it’s hard not to be glutinous. It’s so hard! (Continue Reading)

October 25th
4:42 PM EST
A new home for my books and a more productive workspace. Wait, that second part is a lie. The only way this desk would make me more productive is if it blocked my access to Tumblr. Which, it does not. My books look cozy, though.

A new home for my books and a more productive workspace. Wait, that second part is a lie. The only way this desk would make me more productive is if it blocked my access to Tumblr. Which, it does not. My books look cozy, though.

October 18th
8:43 AM EST
blogfrombookstores:

At Zuccotti Park, A People’s Library

Amid one of the most dynamic political events in recent American history lies one of the most harmonious of places – a library.
Occupy Wall Street has become known for its animated protests and run-ins with police, but walk inside Zuccotti Park – the movement’s unofficial headquarters – and you get a different story. Organizers have created a medical center, food station, and donation drop-off point. But it’s “The People’s Library” that has become an example of the group’s mission and outside support.  
“The library is a demonstration of the fact we aren’t just a bunch of crazies,” said Stephen Boyer, 27, who volunteers there. “Were trying to build a community and we’re succeeding.” (Read more)
(via)
[photo by Kevin Lorla]

blogfrombookstores:

At Zuccotti Park, A People’s Library

Amid one of the most dynamic political events in recent American history lies one of the most harmonious of places – a library.

Occupy Wall Street has become known for its animated protests and run-ins with police, but walk inside Zuccotti Park – the movement’s unofficial headquarters – and you get a different story. Organizers have created a medical center, food station, and donation drop-off point. But it’s “The People’s Library” that has become an example of the group’s mission and outside support.  

“The library is a demonstration of the fact we aren’t just a bunch of crazies,” said Stephen Boyer, 27, who volunteers there. “Were trying to build a community and we’re succeeding.” (Read more)

(via)

[photo by Kevin Lorla]

September 30th
10:19 PM EST
The People’s Library @ Occupy Wall Street

The People’s Library @ Occupy Wall Street

September 23rd
9:51 AM EST
"Print! Print! Print! If I have the option, I always read the paper or a book or something I can touch and destroy in my own hands."
—  Aubrey Plaza, when asked ‘Print or web?’ (via blogfrombookstores)

(via blogfrombookstores)

September 22nd
12:28 PM EST
September 17th
11:08 AM EST
blogfrombookstores:

 Banned Books Week: What subversives are you reading?

Why should Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston  (one of my personal favorites) be a banned book? Because it acknowledges  that sometimes men didn’t treat their wives so well, or because it  features a large cast of African-American people?  (I suspect strongly  that, while it’s both, it’s also very much the latter–there is a high  proportion of banned literature by African-American novelists.)  Are The Grapes of Wrath and The Jungle taboo  because they shine a light on the real struggles of the poor and  working-class Americans?  Mental illness, women’s issues, sex, money,  racism, equal rights–it’s not smut that is being consistently  challenged, or things that are actually depraved.  (Continue reading)
[via The Insatiable Booksluts]

blogfrombookstores:

Banned Books Week: What subversives are you reading?

Why should Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (one of my personal favorites) be a banned book? Because it acknowledges that sometimes men didn’t treat their wives so well, or because it features a large cast of African-American people?  (I suspect strongly that, while it’s both, it’s also very much the latter–there is a high proportion of banned literature by African-American novelists.)  Are The Grapes of Wrath and The Jungle taboo because they shine a light on the real struggles of the poor and working-class Americans?  Mental illness, women’s issues, sex, money, racism, equal rights–it’s not smut that is being consistently challenged, or things that are actually depraved.  (Continue reading)

[via The Insatiable Booksluts]

September 14th
10:36 PM EST
blogfrombookstores:

Join Busboys and Poets on September 21 for International Peace Day and the dedication of their Howard Zinn room! And tomorrow on Blogging from Bookstores learn more about Independent coffee shop, restaurant, and bookstore (Yes! It’s all three in one!) Busboys and Poets!

blogfrombookstores:

Join Busboys and Poets on September 21 for International Peace Day and the dedication of their Howard Zinn room! And tomorrow on Blogging from Bookstores learn more about Independent coffee shop, restaurant, and bookstore (Yes! It’s all three in one!) Busboys and Poets!

September 12th
8:54 PM EST
"'I know bookstores are supposed to be good things, but we don’t have video stores anymore, and maybe we need to get used to the new order instead of lamenting the old.' This is what I’d say to his point: it totally sucks that there’s no more video stores. I spent long nights hanging out at Kim’s in college, deliberating for hours over which random German film from the nineteen-seventies to take home with me. I actually watched stuff like that all the way through then, maybe since I’d spent so much time and energy looking for it. I even miss Blockbuster: when I was a kid, the Friday-night trip to the video store to pick out a movie was the most exciting event of the week. How I watch a video now is: I browse on Netflix for a while, start watching something, get about five minutes in, wonder if I’ve made the right decision, and start the process over. It’s ridiculous, and yet I can’t…stop…clicking…

My point is that I wish we had been able to save the video store. I know the young citizens of the new order don’t miss it, but kids don’t miss anything: they’re kids. And since we haven’t entirely killed the bookstore yet, I would like us not to. Going into bookstores to browse, to attend readings, to interact with the staff, to see the selection they’ve curated—all these things excite me and entice me to read. If my book-buying experience becomes simply me sitting alone on the couch click, click, clicking, I don’t know what I’ll become…"
11:22 AM EST

blogfrombookstores:

Blogging From: Hole in the Wall Books

Bookstores with creative names, are always the best kinds of bookstores. What bookstore lover wouldn’t want to step inside of a store called Hole in the Wall Books, right? It’s funny because I think most people might shy away from any other type of establishment named after an idiom that sometimes has a bit of a negative connotation. But a bookstore with this name; it sounds like it will lead you right into a scene straight out of Alice in Wonderland! It leaves an impression that makes you feel like once you step though the door, you’ll be transported, through a hole in the wall, to a magical land of books. For the most part this is true. Minus the part about going through a hole in the wall. (Continue reading)

September 11th
7:20 PM EST